Khalaadka imtixaanka ka dhaca

1. Not answering the question

There are two main reasons for this:

  1. Not reading the question properly, or
  2. Wanting to answer a slightly different question

2. Not looking at the mark scheme or the space provided

Both the mark scheme and the space provided (if there is one) will provide clues about how much the examiners are expecting to see.

A one-word answer is not going to be enough for a 15-mark question. Check the marks available, and make sure that your answer fits. That said, if you are able to condense your analysis into a shorter space, then do so. You should never write solely to word limits. If your answer is much shorter, be aware that you may have missed something. Check back and make sure that you have really answered the whole question.

3. Panicking

Faced with an exam paper, it is easy to panic, especially if your first reaction is that you are unable to answer any of the questions.

Take a deep breath and count to ten, slowly. That will help you to calm down.

4. Failing to plan your time

Before you start writing, check the number of questions, and the amount of time you have. This will tell you roughly how long you have for each question.

Try to spend no more than that much time on each question. You can always go back later if you have time left over, but it is better to make at least some attempt at each question.

1. Not answering the question

There are two main reasons for this:

  1. Not reading the question properly, or
  2. Wanting to answer a slightly different question

2. Not looking at the mark scheme or the space provided

Both the mark scheme and the space provided (if there is one) will provide clues about how much the examiners are expecting to see.

A one-word answer is not going to be enough for a 15-mark question. Check the marks available, and make sure that your answer fits. That said, if you are able to condense your analysis into a shorter space, then do so. You should never write solely to word limits. If your answer is much shorter, be aware that you may have missed something. Check back and make sure that you have really answered the whole question.

3. Panicking

Faced with an exam paper, it is easy to panic, especially if your first reaction is that you are unable to answer any of the questions.

Take a deep breath and count to ten, slowly. That will help you to calm down.

4. Failing to plan your time

Before you start writing, check the number of questions, and the amount of time you have. This will tell you roughly how long you have for each question.

Try to spend no more than that much time on each question. You can always go back later if you have time left over, but it is better to make at least some attempt at each question.

1. Not answering the question

There are two main reasons for this:

  1. Not reading the question properly, or
  2. Wanting to answer a slightly different question

2. Not looking at the mark scheme or the space provided

Both the mark scheme and the space provided (if there is one) will provide clues about how much the examiners are expecting to see.

A one-word answer is not going to be enough for a 15-mark question. Check the marks available, and make sure that your answer fits. That said, if you are able to condense your analysis into a shorter space, then do so. You should never write solely to word limits. If your answer is much shorter, be aware that you may have missed something. Check back and make sure that you have really answered the whole question.

3. Panicking

Faced with an exam paper, it is easy to panic, especially if your first reaction is that you are unable to answer any of the questions.

Take a deep breath and count to ten, slowly. That will help you to calm down.

4. Failing to plan your time

Before you start writing, check the number of questions, and the amount of time you have. This will tell you roughly how long you have for each question.

Try to spend no more than that much time on each question. You can always go back later if you have time left over, but it is better to make at least some attempt at each question.

1. Not answering the question

There are two main reasons for this:

  1. Not reading the question properly, or
  2. Wanting to answer a slightly different question

2. Not looking at the mark scheme or the space provided

Both the mark scheme and the space provided (if there is one) will provide clues about how much the examiners are expecting to see.

A one-word answer is not going to be enough for a 15-mark question. Check the marks available, and make sure that your answer fits. That said, if you are able to condense your analysis into a shorter space, then do so. You should never write solely to word limits. If your answer is much shorter, be aware that you may have missed something. Check back and make sure that you have really answered the whole question.

3. Panicking

Faced with an exam paper, it is easy to panic, especially if your first reaction is that you are unable to answer any of the questions.

Take a deep breath and count to ten, slowly. That will help you to calm down.

4. Failing to plan your time

Before you start writing, check the number of questions, and the amount of time you have. This will tell you roughly how long you have for each question.

Try to spend no more than that much time on each question. You can always go back later if you have time left over, but it is better to make at least some attempt at each question.

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